Monthly Archives: October 2017

Why MMOs Are Good

We spend a lot of time here criticizing MMOs and their community. And that’s not a bad thing. Constructive criticism is crucial for growth, and there are many mistakes and challenges dogging the world of MMORPGs. Those should be criticized.

MMOs are good Black Desert

But there is a danger in becoming too bogged down in the negative. Sometimes it’s good to take a step back and appreciate what we have. MMOs have problems, but there’s also a lot about them that’s truly special. We wouldn’t be so passionate about them if that wasn’t the case.

So let’s take a moment to celebrate the things that make MMOs good, the things that no other type of entertainment can offer. The things that always bring us back for more.


If you’ve been following my articles for any length of time, you’ve probably noticed I take an extremely cynical view of the MMO community as a whole. The phrase “wretched hive of scum and villainy” does come to mind.

But even if the MMO community is a foul place on the macro scale, that doesn’t mean there can’t be positive stories on a more personal level. While toxic players fight gold sellers for most hated player group, guilds, friends and family groups, and other small factions of players are forming and renewing relationships, making connections in the digital space.

Spend any length of time in the world of MMORPGs, and you’ll find stories of people who met their spouses in-game, or who have forged lifelong friendships in MMOs, or reconnected with old friends via gaming. There are those who have used these games to keep in touch with distant family members or friends in foreign countries. Of course, MMOs are good for socializing – it’s arguably the best digital medium for the activity.

Whatever flaws the greater community may have, there is tremendous value in those smaller connections, in the intimate bonds formed between players.


MMOs are good - Azeroth

MMOs are good at giving us things to do. They’re big. Like really big. While large-scale single-player games like Skyrim and Fallout boast about their huge game worlds and dozens of hours of content, MMOs are sitting in the background like, “That’s cute.”

Even relatively small MMOs tend to rival or outstrip the largest single-player games when it comes to sheer volume of content. Just playing through the story content to level cap can often take weeks, or months. That’s without any grinding or repetition — just playing as you would a single-player title.

And then of course when you do factor in the endgame activities, the number of hours of gameplay available to you balloons even further.

Then you consider larger, older MMOs. Someone new joining World of Warcraft today would probably take at least a year, if not more, of regular play just to experience all of the content that’s currently in the game — again, without resorting to significant grinding or getting into the endgame treadmill. And that’s just one game. There’s also uniquely massive good MMOs like Eve Online, where servers house tens of thousands of players simultaneously on their monolithic servers.

Furthermore, whereas single-player titles are largely static — perhaps with a trickle of DLC that quickly runs dry — MMOs are constantly growing and evolving, with regular infusions of new content for so long as the games operate. Not only are they big, but they’re only getting bigger.

Longevity and Persistence

As I covered earlier this month with the MMOs that died piece, they don’t last forever. That doesn’t mean they aren’t possessed of incredible longevity. EverQuest is approaching its twentieth anniversary. Ultima Online has already passed that milestone. World of Warcraft has been around for over a decade.

And there are people in all of those games who have been playing from the beginning.

MMOs are good Coruscant SWTOR

By comparison, even if you’re the sort of person who likes to replay games many times, most single-player games aren’t likely to last you more than a few months at best. The difference in longevity between the two categories is night and day.

This has value beyond the obvious, beyond the raw number of hours of play you’re going to get out of an MMO. Being able to play a single game for years fosters a sense of history, a sense of belonging, that’s impossible to replicate any other way.

My oldest video game character is my rogue in World of Warcraft. She’s old enough now that if she were a real person, she would have just started third grade. That’s pretty amazing when you think about it. When I created my rogue, my life was completely different from how it is now, but she remains, virtually unchanged after all this time. She’s become one of the few permanent fixtures of my life, and playing her feels like visiting an old friend.

Similarly, logging into a game you’ve played for a long time can feel like coming home. This, for me, is one of the greatest appeals of MMOs. The social element has never been a perfect fit for me, but I love imaginary worlds, and whereas single-player games only let me be a tourist in their settings, MMOs let me set down roots. MMOs are good at providing a permanent virtual world to feel at home.

That’s something I truly love.


One can also look to more practical concerns. If you’re worried about keeping a budget, MMOs provide one of the most cost-effective forms of entertainment around.

Think about it. Going to see a movie will usually cost you somewhere in the neighborhood of $15, and that will only keep you entertained for at most two to three hours.

MMOs are good World of Warcraft

That same $15 can buy you a month of subscription to an MMO, which can potentially provide dozens of hours of entertainment.

And that’s with a pay to play game. When you consider the current prevalence of free to play MMOS and buy to play titles, the potential for entertainment on the cheap becomes virtually infinite. MMOs are good options for the cheaper or poorer players, especially combined with their quantity of content. You can get hundreds of hours of gameplay for just a minimal box price, or even for nothing at all.

Yes, you may be held back in some ways if you never give in to micro-transactions, but take it from a longtime MMO player who’s had some lean times in his life: You’d be amazed how far you can get without paying a cent, even in games with relatively restrictive business models. Even the greediest games will still usually offer most content and rewards to free players; it just might take a little extra effort.

The “I Was There” Factor

If there’s one thing that no other genre of game can replicate — not even smaller scale online games — it’s the ability to say, “I was there.”

Every once in a while, something will happen in an MMO that those present will never forget. Some huge in-game event that will be forever famous… or infamous. Sometimes it’s something carefully scripted by developers. Sometimes it’s something orchestrated by the players. Sometimes it’s a total accident. But it’s always unforgettable.

You know the kind of events I mean. The assassination of Lord British. The opening of Ahn’Qiraj. The corrupted blood pandemic. The fall of Lion’s Arch. World War Bee.

If you’ve never experienced a moment like this, there’s no way to adequately describe what it’s like, but if you’ve played MMOs for any length of time, you’ve probably experienced at least one, and you know how special it is to be able to say, “I was there.”

For me, my favorite took place during the first anniversary celebration of The Secret World. I happened to find myself in the same zone as a streamer who was interviewing the game’s director at the time, Joel Bylos. When the anniversary world boss for that zone spawned, Joel used his GM powers to blow his avatar up to Godzilla size and join players in beating the tar out of the boss.

MMOs are good the secret world

He then danced Gangnam Style for a few moments before vanishing without a trace.

It was equal parts epic and hilarious, and it’s a memory I will always treasure.

Oh, and that streamer? We’re still friends to this day.

That’s my favorite, but I have other “I was there” moments from across my MMO career. I was there when the Legion hit Westfall. I was there when Bacon Squad took the fight to the Karka. I was there when Gaia’s chosen drove back the Whispering Tide.

We all have our own moments, our own stories. That’s what the scale and the unpredictability of MMOs offer, what no other genre of game can replicate: The chance to be a part of virtual history, the chance to experience once in a lifetime moments that will never come again.

The chance to say, “I was there.”

What’s Your Reason?

We all have different feelings on different mechanics, but there’s no denying that MMOs are good and well. Some might play MMOs for the social connections. For me, it’s about the opportunity to fully inhabit a virtual world and bear witness to its history as it unfolds.

What’s your reason? What is it that keeps you coming back to MMOs?

Five MMOs That Died Young

The sad reality is that MMOs aren’t forever. Someone has to pay to keep the servers online, and as the years advance and revenues dwindle, it can become harder for companies to justify the expense. Even sadder are the MMOs that died too young. While it’s unrealistic to expect MMOs and MMORPGs to last forever, there’s often a lot of potential that gets left on the table with canceled or dead MMOs.

For fans, it’s always sad to see a game go. They are cut down before their time, their players left adrift to dream of what might have been. Today, we’ll be taking a look at some of the most unique and beloved MMORPGs to have met a premature end.

The Matrix Online

MMOs that Died - Matrix Online

If ever there was a perfect setting for an MMORPG, it is the Matrix. A virtual world about a virtual world — it only makes sense. Its release came only two years after the Matrix trilogy ended. It was therefore surprising that it joined the ranks of MMOs that died in 2009, after only four years of existence. The creators of the Matrix films, the Wachowskis, even gave their blessing to declare The Matrix Online the official continuation of the story that began in the movies.

Players were able to join one of three factions — the human rebels of Zion, the machines who control the Matrix, or the renegades of the Merovingian — and new story content, tailored to each faction, was delivered on a regular basis.

Matrix Online had more to offer than a great setting, too. It also boasted a unique combat system based on both real time “free fire” and close-quarters combat in slowed down bullet time. The class system was quite flexible as well, with the three main classes being augmented by numerous sub-classes for a variety of roles.

But despite the strength of its setting and its many interesting ideas, The Matrix Online was not a runaway success. The population, never huge, dwindled over the years, and the game’s production values took a nosedive. The story began to take some very questionable turns, further souring opinion of the game.

Ultimately, the population bled down to just a few hundred people, and in 2009, after just four years of operation, The Matrix Online shut down for good. There was a final in-game event in an attempt to provide some closure to the story, but even that was a buggy mess, preventing many people from fully appreciating it.

The Matrix Online now stands as one of the greatest examples of wasted potential in the MMO space.


MMOs that Died - Landmark

Voxel-based building sandbox Landmark was another game with a strange and tormented history. Originally, it was developed as a building tool for the much hyped EverQuest: Next. It proved so popular with its own developers that it was then spun-off as its own game, launching into early access.

It languished in early access for a very long time, and even when it finally did launch for real, it was often plagued by polish issues and stability problems.

Nonetheless, it was a game with a lot to offer. While there are other building games out there, none have ever been quite like Landmark. Its unusually high graphical fidelity and extremely easy to use toolset allowed most anyone to make true works of art.

Conventional wisdom says that if you give players the tools to make their own content, the large majority of it will be terrible, but Landmark disproved that as a lie. Nearly every build in Landmark was beautiful or fascinating, and every log-in brought new wonders to explore.

But it was not to last. Daybreak put little effort into advertising the game after its initial early access launch, and worse, when EverQuest: Next was cancelled, the greater gaming community chose to take its frustrations out on Landmark, review bombing it and generally taking every opportunity to sully its name. Daybreak seems to be more associated now with old MMORPGs and MMOs that died more than releasing anything new or of note.

Under-supported by its own developer and unfairly persecuted by the community at large, Landmark failed to find a strong enough audience, and shut down less than a year after its official launch, taking with all the amazing creations of its players.

The Secret World

MMOs that Died - The Secret World

Unlike the other games on this list, it is still possible for at least some people to play The Secret World (without the aid of an emulator). But if it’s not yet entirely dead, it is at least mostly dead.

With the launch of its reboot, Secret World Legends, it is no longer possible to purchase or otherwise create a new account for TSW, so only those who were already players can still access it. All plans for future content have also been scrapped, and the game’s population has cratered. It now seems only a matter time before the servers are shut down altogether.

And that is a terrible loss for the world of online gaming, as over its five years of life TSW proved itself one of the most unique MMORPGs ever made. Its writing was impeccable, its modern setting was darkly fascinating, its missions were challenging, and its build system put an almost unheard of level of power in the hands of the player.

But it always struggled financially due to poor marketing, a steep learning curve, and its mature subject matter. The reboot as Legends was a final attempt to reverse the game’s fortune’s, but I have my doubts over whether Legends can do any better than its predecessor, and even if it does, a lot of what made the original TSW special has been lost in the transition. Many may view Secret World Legends as simply a F2P Secret World, but I assure you that The Secret World’s time is past and thus, belongs in the ranks of MMOs that died too young.

Adding insult to injury is the dishonest way the entire transition has been handled. For months, fans were told that new content for TSW was in production, when all along the plan was to abandon the game in favor of the reboot.

City of Heroes

MMOs that Died - City of Heroes

The closure of City of Heroes in 2012 sent shockwaves through the entire MMO community. It may not have quite been a household name, but it had always been well-regarded and respectably successful, and its sudden end was a sobering reminder of just how uncertain the future of any MMO can be.

Over its eight years of life, the superhero MMO built up a modest but very tightly knit community and developed a uniformly positive reputation within the greater MMORPG space. Critics praised it, its players were passionate, and even those who didn’t actively play largely held City of Heroes in high regard. In a community infamous for negativity, CoH managed to emerge largely unscathed.

That made it truly shocking when publisher NCsoft decided to close the game. Even finances shed little light on the decision, as all indications are that CoH remained profitable, even if only modestly so, until the end.

For fans, it was a betrayal, and for many it permanently poisoned the reputation of NCsoft. Even for those who did not play, it was a stark wake-up call on just how capricious the world of online gaming can be. If a game as well-regarded as City of Heroes wasn’t safe, what is?

In a cruel irony, many City of Heroes players chose The Secret World as their new home, only to be uprooted yet again a few short years later.

The love for City of Heroes has spawned many crowdfunded spiritual successors, such as Valiance Online and City of Titans, but it remains to be seen which, if any, will survive to become completed games.

Star Wars Galaxies

MMOs that Died - Star Wars GalaxiesStar Wars Galaxies could almost be seen as the poster child for MMOs that died too young. I think for a lot of people it was the game that woke up them to the possibility that MMOs could end suddenly.

Much digital ink has already been spilled on the saga of SWG, so you’re probably at least somewhat familiar with it. It was certainly not without its difficulties, as large-scale overhauls known as the “Combat Upgrade” and “New Game Enhancements” caused intense, divisive controversies within its community.

Despite this, SWG remains an incredibly beloved title for many people, and is often held up as the paragon of good sandbox design, a game that offered the freedom to explore many different playstyles and still be a valuable part of the greater online community.

Still, it wasn’t enough to save the game. Star Wars Galaxies shut down with a final in-game event in 2011 after eight years. A clear answer on what exactly lead to SWG’s demise is difficult to come by, but it was likely due to the upcoming release of Star Wars: The Old Republic and the competition for players that would have arisen between the two games.

Still, many years after its end, SWG remains a popular topic of discussion among the community, with a vocal if displaced fanbase. The continued love for SWG has spawned many emulator projects, so there is still an option out there to play it… or a reasonable facsimile thereof.

Enjoy Them While You Can

If there’s a lesson to take from all this, it’s that you can never know for sure what the future will hold for your MMO of choice. So enjoy them while you can. MMOs slowly lose players to new games or simply time and their MMO deaths are inevitable. So my advice – don’t sweat the small stuff, and appreciate them for what they are, because one day you won’t have the chance.

Unless you play World of Warcraft. That thing will be around forever.

8 Good MMORPGs to Play With Friends

I’ve slowly come to an important realization. The time in my life where I could truly dedicate myself to a single MMORPG has past. It sounds like a bummer for someone bearing MMO Bro as a moniker, but it’s not so bad. My only complaint is the difficulty it presents when it comes to socialization. Spending time to build up friendships in a game I might not play in a few months is tough. Fortunately, many a gaming friendship has persisted throughout the years (both of the online and offline variety). For that reason I’ve been looking more into good MMORPGs to play with friends. These are either games I can start off soloing and bring friends in later or join an existing friend who’s really enjoying themselves.

Just like players who prefer solo vs. group content, what makes an MMORPG good to play with friends is highly subjective. The key aspects to me are some form of level scaling or horizontal progression, a focus on group content, alt encouragement, and bonuses to playing with a consistent group. The below list is roughly ranked from 8th to 1st, but I’ve avoided a true “top 8” this time around because of the inherent subjectivity.


neverwinter good mmorpg with friends screenshot

Neverwinter is a Dungeons and Dragons inspired MMORPG. Thus, it unsurprisingly includes dungeons and dungeon offshoots called skirmishes as a primary method of advancement. These can be tackled by groups of five players and make for a fairly balanced challenge. Players can also create their own dungeons using the Foundry system so tabletop players may also enjoy making and sharing their scenarios with friends.

There’s also some form of downleveling for friends who want to play Neverwinter with their lower level pals. Unfortunately it’s only available for dungeons and not the shorter skirmishes, with the exception of a Call to Arms event. The Calls to Arms skirmishes allow players of practically any level to play together in a special event. They just don’t tend to run for very long. The level scaling isn’t super well balanced either as higher level players maintain their improved skill ranks. This can lead to the lower level player feeling somewhat useless. Nonetheless, the wealth of group oriented content in Neverwinter with some option for players of disparate levels earns Neverwinter a spot on this list.

Play Neverwinter for free here.


Elvenar playing with friends

The vast majority of city builders revolve around killing other players. These leads to two issues – paying to actually win and elimination of friends from the world. Elimination doesn’t really make for a very good MMORPG to play with friends. Elvenar solves these issues for players who want something casual to play from their browser but still enjoy the interaction with others. Elvenar is a purely PvE city builder with a multitude of options to assist other players.

Neighborly Help is one such concept that will reward you with gold for donating resources to another player. Of course that means others are also encouraged to donate to you. Moving outside of the city building and into combat, Elvenar recently added Fellowship Adventures. Players can assist each other in an asynchronous adventure where each player conquers challenges individually. The game’s turn based combat strikes a good balance between browser simplicity and tactical challenge. It is sadly missing any sort of real time cooperative element. Hopefully one day the developers will tack that on too. While Elvenar is far from perfect, it’s a good option for friends seeking a lower time commitment browser MMO.

Play Elvenar for free here.

Final Fantasy XIV

final fantasy xiv good to play with friends image

There’s no doubt that Final Fantasy XIV is a great game. However, most of that is geared towards story or playing with a consistent group of equally dedicated players. There is downscaling for dungeons, but I don’t find this as rewarding as other MMOs. The real reason that I think Final Fantasy XIV is a good MMORPG to play with friends is because of the game’s job system.

This is one MMO game that has basically eliminated the need for alts because players can change jobs (i.e. classes) at the drop of a hat. There are base job level requirements for many advanced jobs, which encourages players to “start over” with a lower level job. There’s a little more to it than that, but the system is easy to explain. More experienced players can dedicate a lower level job to playing with particular people. Eventually those jobs levels will manifest in usage either through subclassing or flexibility for higher level content.

Buy Final Fantasy XIV here.


rift good mmorig play with friends image

Rift has always struck an interesting balance between group and solo play. A lot of content revolves around the game’s titular rifts that require players to work together to close. They’re fun but can deliver a samey experience after a while. That community system has evolved over the years into instant adventures which provides level scaled quests for up to twenty players. It’s a very appealing feature when typical MMORPG group caps of 4 to 5 just don’t cut it.

In addition, Rift offers a mentoring and sidekick system. When enabled, this will scale grouped players up or down based on the zone’s content and the party members’ levels. Some will really appreciate that Rift allows for level scaling for those who want it without necessarily forcing it upon everyone. The ability to play with a large group of friends without relying on endgame raids is also fairly unique among MMORPGs.

Play Rift for free here.


warframe mmorpg with friends image

What makes Warframe so good to play with friends is very similar to Final Fantasy XIV’s appeal. There is no level scaling in this game, but there is a plethora of warframes which play differently in a manner similar to MOBA characters like in League of Legends. Each warframe has it’s own level, but there are a number of factors that separate this approach from simple alt characters.

The biggest of these factors is the existence of mastery ranks. These are metalevels gained from ranking up companions, weapons, and warframes. Higher mastery ranks grant access to more tools, increases starting mod capacity, and raises many daily limits. It’s also a bit easier to increase mastery ranks with fresh warframes and weapons as they level up faster. Speaking of weapons, those also level up in this game, which increases mod capacity. If all of that isn’t enough, players can also reset a warframe’s rank to change polarities (which alters which types of mods can be slotted). These features can make Warframe feel like a grindy MMO at times, but on the bright side there’s a lot of flexibility for friends seeking an MMORPG to play with one another.

Play Warframe for free here.

Guild Wars 2

guild wars 2 mmorpg to play with friends image

Guild Wars 2 launched with a mission not to waste people’s time with grinding for items and levels. Though that’s arguably a core concept of the genre, Guild Wars 2 has largely succeeded in eschewing the common progression treadmill. Levels come fast and, thanks to zone downscaling, allows players to explore low level areas without sacrificing some semblance of challenge. But leveling up together in zones is just part of what Guild Wars 2 offers friend circles.

World vs World (WvW) is an ongoing massive struggle between three servers that resets weekly. Servers of players will rank up or down according to the results. Upon entering WvW all players are bolstered to max level. Small groups can often be effective in contributing to the war, but there’s plenty of reason for your small group to join a larger one. Now, GW2 is not only a very good MMORPG to play with friends who like PvE or PvP combat but is also great for those who like exploration. The lands of Tyria are littered with jumping puzzles that can be fun to solve together. There’s a little something for everyone to experience, and it can all be done as part of a team.

Play Guild Wars 2 for free here.

Eve Online

eve online good mmorpg to play with friends image

For the group of friends that would rather kill another group than kill AI controlled critters, I present Eve Online. This an MMO that’s great for friends because of the skill system and combat structure. It takes almost no time for a player to effectively pilot a baseline frigate. While these light ships can’t compare to cruisers or capital ships in terms of sheer firepower, they have their own roles in battle. They’re also speedy and make for great pirate ships or guerilla tactical strikes. A band of friends can easily have a blast as a group of frigates roaming the vastness of space.

Another core feature of Eve Online is that the skills train in real time. More casual players won’t fear the sensation of getting lapped by their more hardcore companions. For groups that can’t always play on the same schedule, it alleviates a lot of anxiety that can come with getting into a new MMO. Eve Online is all about an endgame that starts immediately and everyone is welcome to join in. The PvE features aren’t really the most exciting though so be prepared to fight against others sooner or later.

Play Eve Online for free here.

Elder Scrolls Online

elder scrolls online good for friends image

Late last year, Elder Scrolls Online made a huge change that’s completely altered the accessibility of the game. One Tamriel went all in on level scaling by adjusting lower level players up to the game’s soft level cap. This level scaling was in effect all the time and meant that with the exception of a few higher level dungeons, anyone could go anywhere at any time. In my opinion, the game shifted into a much stronger Elder Scrolls feel that rewarded exploration. At the same time, it opened the doors for friends with different interests and different time commitments to play with one another.

There is a ton of content to discover in Elder Scrolls Online: solo dungeons called delves, public dungeons, skyshard hunting, questing, instanced dungeons, three faction PvP, and more. And all of it can be played alongside one’s buddies and/or significant other. I’ve been able to attract a lot of people to ESO, and that’s largely due to One Tamriel. In my mind, Elder Scrolls Online is not only good, but is the best MMORPG to play with friends right now. But like I said before, it’s all subjective.

Buy Elder Scrolls Online here.

Friend Up!

Some of the above titles also offer refer a friend programs. If you find a new MMORPG that strikes your fancy, do a little research. You might find that inviting friends can bring rewards for both the inviter and invitee. And of course if you feel like there’s a game missing from the list, add it in the comments. We are talking about MMORPGs that are best played with friends after all. The more the merrier!


The Greater Evil: Gold Sellers or Toxic Players?

As MMORPGs have carved out their sizable hole in the video game industry, they’ve attracted all sorts of scrupulous folks. One of those is the third party gold seller. Black markets for real money transactions have been around since Ultima Online. Back then people used eBay to sell gold for real money. This eventually evolved into China (and others) creating jobs out of farming in-game currency to resell it. These real world monetary ties have been only further enforced through items like lockboxes. Now every MMORPG (especially the free to play MMOs) are filled with bots spamming chats with gold selling services or occupying grind spots to make more gold to sell you.

Along with the prevalence of RMT, the sheer size of MMORPG communities have created another type of nuisance: toxic players. Reputation just doesn’t matter as much as it used to when MMORPG communities were tighter knit and games necessitated player interaction to accomplish anything. The risk accompanying trolling or harassing players affected behavior when it meant real penalties. EverQuest players would blackball trolls from groups and Ultima Online players could straight up kill you and loot your belongings. Now that MMO anonymity reigns supreme, with things like pugs comprising most of the grouping content in MMOs and an increase in dispensable characters through fast leveling, the average player is more likely to make a mom joke than help you learn the ropes. Nobody wants to be cursed out or harassed during their wind down time, but toxic players just don’t care who they hurt.

Gold sellers and toxic players. Both thorns in the side of the silent majority MMORPG player, but who is worse?

The Case Against Gold Sellers

Chat Spam

“Go to w w w . hax0rz-gold-place . i o to get 1,000 gp for $1 SPECIALS 24 HOURS ONLY BUY NOW!!!! Whipser me!!”

Surely you’ve seen something similar to the above. Surely you’ve seen it paint an entire chat log. When $1 buys you an hour’s worth of work in gathering gold, it’s no wonder people turn to gold sellers. While I don’t blame buyers for eliminating grinding from their MMO diet, the unfortunate consequence is that gold sellers need to plaster their services everywhere to get noticed by those buyers. Even people I know who buy gold block the spam from their chats, but new names and accounts pop up everyday. It’s not like it’s hard to do when they’re all…

Bots, Bots, Bots

There used to be a time when men were men. Now men are bots, at least those farming for gold. Nothing makes a world feel more hollow than watching a train of supposed players slaying monsters with robotic rhythm. It also cheapens the entire experience seeing that your job could be finished by a handful of scripts.

Pay to Win

MMORPGs with a heavy PvP slant can see competitive balance completely upturned by gold sellers. Let’s be real, actual player skill level is a fraction of one’s prowess. The bread and butter of strength for the vast majority of MMORPGs lies in spending time just playing the game. Paying gold sellers in certain ecosystems can result in power spikes that would be impossible otherwise. Of course, some companies don’t even need gold sellers to ruin competitive balance. Developers can usually find a way to keep massive monetary infusions from ruining their game (like bind on pickup items in World of Warcraft).

The Case Against Toxic Players


If something goes wrong, there’s a good chance somebody is going to blow a fuse. There’s an even higher chance that the target of their ire isn’t going to be themselves but someone else in the group. That’s when bitter insults get flung across the virtual chat logs at whoever the insulter is placing the blame on. But that’s besides the point. Nobody messes up on purpose (well, not true, but we’ll get to that). Insults ruin the experience for everyone – either the group needs to boot out the offender and wait for a replacement or suffer angry banter for the next hour.


Then there are the people who get their jollies from purposefully playing poorly or antagonizing with the express purpose to agitate. This may be a reaction from another group member dropping the ball or a perceived slight against them for whatever reason. Trolls can sometimes provide a fun counter to the bitter insulter types, but that’s rarely the case. Instead they usually put all of their effort not just into degradation but to actively cause failures. No chat filter in the world can save you from that.

Social Contract

An old philosophical theory, the social contract represents an implicit agreement among members for a society to cooperate for social benefits. In the context of MMORPGs, this means more levels and more loot. While some developers are diving into anti-social multiplayer games, MMORPGs still remain largely about inclusion. In my opinion, this social contract is one of the top reasons why the genre is so strong. When somebody refuses to cooperate, their sending a message that society is so broken we should just play the game by ourselves.

Who Loses?

I’m certainly not going to argue gold sellers or toxic players are good for MMORPG communities. We’ve even posted some practical solutions for lowering toxicity. There’s only so much that can be done though. Policing toxic players past a certain point is going to get innocents into the mix and result in even less communicative games. At that point, I’m done with the genre. I don’t play MMORPGs to measure by item level rankings against other players. Meanwhile, gold sellers can be restricted by gaming systems that ensure the player meet some requirements themselves before being able to fully make use of the gold.

So with that, I have to conclude that toxic players are far worse for MMORPGs than gold sellers.

The Strange Saga of Dark and Light

Often times the stories behind MMOs are at least as interesting as the games themselves. It’s one of the most fun things of writing about them. One of the most interesting stories in recent memory is that of the long and difficult road tread by Dark and Light, the ambitious MMORPG turned fantasy survival sandbox.

Join me as I explore the unique and tortured history of this game.

In the Beginning…

The original Dark and Light MMORPG, circa 2006

The original version of Dark and Light was developed by a company called NPCube. One of the most surprising things I learned while researching this article is that NPCube was based in Réunion, a place I had never even heard of. It turns out to be a small island in the Indian Ocean off the coast of Madagascar, and a territory of France. This means it’s part of the European Union despite being nowhere near Europe.

That doesn’t really impact on the story of Dark and Light the game, but it does add an extra texture to this already strange story.

NPCube began development of Dark and Light in 2002. It was envisioned as an ambitious sandbox MMORPG of impressive scale. Its biggest selling point was its massive game world, one of the largest ever seen at fifteen thousand square miles.

It also gave players a wealth of options on who they could be and how to play. It featured no less than twelve playable races and fourteen classes. Progression focused on more than just fighting, as players earned separate experience points for combat, crafting, and social gameplay.

However, Dark and Light struggled to live up to this ambition. It languished in beta testing until investors, hoping to finally see some return for their money, pressured it into launch in 2006.

Reception was not good. The game was obviously unfinished, with poor graphics, incomplete features, and numerous bugs.

Dark and Light’s publisher, Farlan Entertainment, went into damage control mode. They acknowledged that the game had been released too soon and began work on improvements to the game, especially the oft-criticized graphics. To this end they signed a deal with the Chinese company Snail Games, who would provide assistance in getting Dark and Light up to snuff.

Along the way, Dark and Light adopted a hybrid free-to-play model, but first impressions are lasting impressions, and it continued to struggle.

To make matters worse, in 2007 another company, VWORLD LLC, sued NPCube, alleging they had used some of VWORLD’s technology in the development of Dark and Light without permission. This led to a countersuit from NPCube, who claimed that their reputation had been unfairly damaged by VWORLD.

After a lengthy legal battle, courts ruled in favor of VWORLD, dismissing NPCube’s lawsuit and finding that they had, in fact, used VWORLD’s technology. They were required to pay €50,000 in damages to VWORLD.

Panned by reviewers, rejected by players, and crippled by the lawsuit, Dark and Light the MMORPG met its end in 2008, with the servers shutting down for good.


The new Dark and Light survival sandbox

For most games, the story would end there, but Dark and Light is not most games. Around that time, Snail Games fully acquired the rights to the game.

For eight years, Dark and Light was little heard from, but then, in 2016, Snail Games suddenly announced a total reboot of it with a new game engine, altered lore, and revamped gameplay. Early this year, it released into early access.

Dark and Light is now little recognizable from its original concept. Instead of a full MMORPG, it is now a survival sandbox featuring both official and private servers. The original twelve playable races has been trimmed down to just three. The class system has been throw out entirely and replaced with skill-based progression where a single character can, in theory, eventually learn everything.

You can almost see this is a metaphor for the trajectory of online gaming as a whole. In 2006, MMORPGs were all the rage. Now MMOs are not as trendy, and all the focus is on survival sandboxes, and Dark Light has changed accordingly.

I do find it strange Snail bothered to resurrect the Dark and Light name at all, actually. I don’t get the impression there was a huge Dark and Light fanbase to tap into. If you’re going to change so much, from the game engine to the fundamental genre, why not just make a new game altogether?

But maybe I’m missing something. Maybe there’s something unique and special about the Dark and Light setting that was worth carrying forward.

There is also something of a beautiful irony to the fact that the original Dark and Light failed because it launched unfinished, and now its reboot has launched into early access. Much of the same kind of problems that doomed its forebear now afflict the new Dark and Light, but now we live in a time where bugs and unfinished features are no longer considered disqualifying.

Maybe the original Dark and Light was just ahead of its time.

It is, as I have said, a very strange story. And we must remember that it is not over yet. The life of Dark and Light’s reboot has only just begun. The developers are hoping it can introduce the survival sandbox genre to fans of more traditional high fantasy MMOs. Perhaps they will succeed and Dark and Light will overcome its troubled past to become a great success.

Or perhaps it will be just another game to languish eternally in early access and eventually slide into obscurity and oblivion once again.

We’ll see.