Tag Archives: Ultima Online

Does RMT Have a Place in MMOs?

RMT. Real money trading. The nasty three letter acronym associated with gold farming, pay to win, and bots. It’s existed in MMOs for the better part of two decades, back when Ultima Online gold traded at higher exchange rates (200 gold to $1 USD) than the Italian Lira, Hungarian Forint, Indonesian Rupiah, Vietnamese Dong, Colombian Peso, and several other real world countries (250 to 14,000 units to $1 USD). This was in era where all real money trading took place on eBay (sometimes facilitated by company employees), before more specialized shops opened their doors.

ultima online gold pile

People will kill to become a Colombian millionaire.

Eventually, massive inflation sets in because wolves somehow drop coins and MMORPG NPCs print money on demand to buy player trash. Money sinks like repair costs and auction house taxes never offset the constant printing of game currency. Even the loss of capital when ships blow up on Eve Online can’t compete with the universe’s infinite resources. The effects of MMO currency inflation on RMT is as multifaceted as it is unclear. The obvious impact is the increased cost of goods. This drives players with more real world money, less time, or both, to seek out-of-game methods to acquire in game currency. And where there is demand, there is supply.

MMO RMT carries a host of problems. The chief issue being the devaluation of the most active players’ time. What’s the point of grinding for hours on end when top gear can be purchased for a day’s paycheck? Diminishing the reasons to actually play the MMO is a major negative for anti-RMT folks.

At some point it’s too lucrative of a money making proposition to pass up. In 2005, over 100,000 people in China reported working as full time gold farmers (“gold” acting as a moniker for all virtual MMO currency). These “players” contribute nothing meaningful to the game, mindlessly killing creatures for loot. At it’s worst, gold farming creates violations of human rights. To increase efficiency, gold sellers use bots to generate even more gold. This unnatural crowding of high end areas pushes real players out. Even if players can avoid the bot infestation, constant channel spam for “BUY GOLD $5=5000G WWW.CASH4GOLDMMOSTYLEYO.COM” ruins actual human communication. People need to be able to gripe publicly without fear of the bot takeover. The effect of the supply side absolutely damages the average player’s experience. That doesn’t even take into account the ethics of gold buying.

wow mmo rmt chart

Inflation occurs quickly.

MMORPGs are first and foremost games. It’s even part of the acronym! Real money trading is essentially cheating. Imagine playing a board game with friends. You offer to take another player out for the price of $5. They accept and cruise to victory. What’s the point in playing when money will decide the outcome? More topically now that the NFL season has begun, imagine paying $5 to a fantasy football leaguemate for Antonio Brown. That’s a big change that affects the fair competition of the entire league. At the same time, these examples ignore a major difference between MMORPGs and other games. MMORPGs are also virtual worlds with real economies and thus, inherently valuable currency.

In the cheating examples, the time commitment for those games is significantly less than in top MMOs. You also play to win, which is rarely part of MMORPGs, despite the oft-used “pay to win” label. Competition of a sort still exists, but ultimately time dictates who sees the greatest success. When top guilds in World of Warcraft spend a full time job’s worth of hours raiding, it’s pretty obvious that not everyone can compete. Here, money is the great equalizer. After all, time = money. Does that justify real money trading? I think it’s at least a fair argument.

As evidenced by just how many RMT stores exist, a significant number of players obviously agree. It may not be fair that players can use real money to purchase virtual goods. It’s also not fair that players have more time than others. This is what happens when progression is based on primarily on time rather than skill. Players don’t really improve at MMORPGs, they just dedicate more time. The only way to advance is to play more, and that’s simply not an option for many people. How else can these individuals keep up with top players except to turn to RMT? Admittedly, some are also the cheater types who will do anything to get an unfair edge. They’re not looking to just level the playing field, but to beat out everyone else at whatever cost. RMT doesn’t change that. There’s always hacks, exploits, and bots for cheating.

Let’s take away the negative indirect affects of RMT: gold farming, chat spamming, increased customer service expenses, and bots. If we could do away with those, is the time = money defense a good enough reason to support RMT? I can see both sides. It is cheating, but it’s not like all players are playing by the same rules anyway. Putting more time into an MMORPG is like getting more moves in a board game. I think it’s up to MMORPG developers to design a game that limits the appeal and usage of RMT.

guild wars 2 gem rmt chart

Even though World of Warcraft is rampant with gold sellers, I feel it’s designed well enough to limit RMT. The best gear must be earned in challenging raid environments and cannot be traded. The items people can buy with gold minimally impact other players. I’m not going to fault someone for spending $10 to buy a mount instead of hours of mindless grinding. Guild Wars 2 launched with the mantra end game gear should be easily attainable. Real money trading mainly leads to cosmetics in Guild Wars 2. I’m good with that. They also implemented their own developer-run RMT shop, which drastically cuts down on RMT’s outright negative ramifications. Horizontal progression may lessen the need for RMT given that there’s little to vertically separate players.

Virtual currency will always have real world value. MMORPGs will always require time to advance. Real money trading will always exist because of these perpetuities. I do not dislike RMT inherently, but don’t enjoy the environment it creates. I doubt even active real money traders do. Still, I think it has a place to eliminate tediousness. It just takes foresight to build an MMORPG with RMT and it’s effects in mind. After all, we’ve come a long way from buying gold in Ultima Online.


Virtual Worlds Ironically Lacking in MMORPGs

When I played Ultima Online for the first time, figments of my imagination began bleeding into a reality. A game now existed in which I could truly live an alternate life. In many ways, it transcended the simple game tag and provided my first virtual world experience. I expected many immersive, virtual worlds to follow. After all, MMORPGs were only entering their infancy in the late 90s when Ultima Online launched.

ultima online housing good for virtual worlds

Wait? You mean I used to be able to see the OUTSIDE of player houses too?

For a time, I felt this virtual vision was coming to fruition. Several titles around the turn of the century created something more than a game. They created vivid, breathing virtual worlds. Nowadays MMORPGs feel a little too much like games. It’s a little disappointing because the genre is a fantastic springboard for creating believable worlds filled with player controlled alternate identities. Maybe this is a case of rose tinted bias, but I think it has more to do with the modernization of MMORPGs, the rise of casual gaming, and minimal creativity in adapting to those changes.

Time Investment

The biggest downside of true virtual worlds is that they require a lot of time to really appreciate. My free time allotment when in school allowed me to really dive into the alternate realities developers had crafted. Spending some extra time trying to decipher where to go for a quest in EverQuest didn’t feel frustrating. It just pulled me deeper into the world.

In today’s gaming climate, a quest-driven MMORPG would find itself with a pretty limited audience without obvious World of Warcraft style quest markers. That’s largely because somebody with a limited schedule wants to feel like they can accomplish something in thirty minutes. And somebodies with thirty minutes to spare are in the majority. This creates situations where developers create short feedback loops to fuel the MMORPG achievement addiction. And that has some long term implications that run counter to crafting virtual worlds.

star wars cantina image

It wasn’t perfect, but Star Wars Galaxies cantina performances pulled players into its virtual world.

You see, in order to create a believable virtual world, it needs to follow certain properties of the real world. One of the general properties of the real world is that in order to be successful, one needs to put hard work. It should follow then that one’s character must put in hard work in order to achieve virtual world success. “But Bro, I play games for fun not to work”, you say. Guess what? I do too!

Notice in the above paragraph the use of the word character instead of player? In general, I think developers (and publishers, probably more importantly) focus too much on what’s worked in the past. Character progression is typically a 1 to 1 ratio of character to player effort. If a character cannot progress without the player, then MMORPGs are pigeonholed into casual advancement. This is why I love MMORPGs like Eve Online, Black Desert Online, and Crowfall building AFK progression systems. It frees the player from working for all of their success and places much of that burden of the character.

Additionally, hard work is not inherently boring. If I want this blog to do well, I need to put in the effort and write a lot. My success is linked to hours spent writing, promoting, socializing, and other blog-like activities. I enjoy these things (or I wouldn’t be here). If active character progression is time consuming but enjoyable that’s OK. Unfortunately, MMORPGs tend to emphasize repetitive tasks AKA grinding. Whether it’s quest grinding or mob grinding, the negative effect on the player is the same. This is why I love dynamic events in games like Guild Wars 2 and hope to see the concept continue to evolve.

Eve Online's skill queue responsible for its strong virtual world

Spreadsheet simulator isn’t so bad when it lets my character, not me, do the heavy lifting.

Great, unique concepts like AFK progression and dynamic events push us closer to believable virtual worlds. They advance characters through the character handling the boring heavy lifted instead of the player. Equally important to character progression is the world’s evolution. Enticing players with the promise of a persistent world, MMORPGs subversively promise a world that behaves differently due to the player’s participation. This is largely not the case.

Persistent, Virtual Worlds

A persistent world technically means little more than a near 24/7 online, virtual game world for the player to access. MMORPGs do in fact provide that service, but persistent worlds seem to take themselves a little too literally. In the vast majority of the genre’s games, the worlds do not change. Players defeat the same quests, mobs reset, everything important gets instanced. A player’s character has nearly no impact on the persistently static worlds of most MMORPGs.

A true virtual world should change based on character actions. My immersion breaks pretty easily when GIANT DRAGON X gets defeated for the thousandth time on my server. Infinite resources, best in slot legendaries, static economies, and instanced content sever any remaining semblance of immersion.  This doesn’t make modern MMORPGs bad games. It makes them bad virtual worlds.

Ultimately, immersion is why creating a true virtual world is important. Virtual worlds immerse players into inhabiting an alternate persona. This is a platform created that can continuously evolve as the player plays their character. The opportunity to interact with real people who can do real things should enhance that experience. Yet, the systems available feel anything but immersive. I enjoy progression and socializing in MMORPGs, but right now I play single player when I want immersion. That shouldn’t be the case.

I’m not saying immersion is a prerequisite for a good MMORPG. They are games, first and foremost. The genre is vast and there are many ways to entertain. I’m just saying MMORPGs are dropping the ball in an area where they had a distinct advantage fifteen years ago. Bring back actual virtual worlds, and they’ll reclaim that “believable alternate reality” throne pretty quickly.


Best MMORPG By Year: Part 1 (1996 – 2005)

Want only the past ten years? Skip to Part 2 (2006 – 2015).

MMORPGs have grown to such heights now that they warrant their own category for year end video game awards. However, MMOs evolve to a much greater extent than games from other genres. An MMORPG’s full potential might not be realized until years after launch. It is with this thought in mind, and the fact that hindsight is 20/20, that we’ll be taking a retroactive look at the best MMORPG by year for the past twenty years. We’ll start in 1996, the first time that multiple graphical MMORPGs would release in the same year.

Best MMORPG of 1996 – The Realm (Online)

Runner-up: Furcadia

the realm online best mmorpg 1996 image

Originally launched as simply The Realm in 1996, this cartoony MMO game graphically resembles old point and click style games like Quest for Glory. The Realm offered a surprising wealth of content in its debut year that included player housing, a 1000 level cap, multiple dungeons to explore, and a decent character creation system. The Realm Online’s most notable feature though is its turn based, tactical combat. Although most mobs aren’t terribly challenging, this style of combat added a layer of depth still not present in any many MMORPGs. It also lead to some tense, tactical PvP battles in The Realm.

Of course, The Realm is pretty flawed too. After seeing all the heavily instanced world has to offer, there isn’t much else to do besides grind. There isn’t a real trading system either (only gifting or dropping items) so players hire middle men to facilitate trades, which has been abused by scammers. Yet it doesn’t compare to the “old days” where a lack of solid protection for players’ houses led to unintended burglaries or the gold duping exploit that massively inflated every item’s price. Despite being fixed, these issues sadly persist as the most notable memories of The Realm.

The Realm Online seems to still be running. It was apparently sold to a group of fans several years ago, who have managed to keep it running but do little else to entice players.

Best MMORPG of 1997 – Ultima Online

Runner-up: Tibia

ultima online 1997 best mmorpg image

I thought for sure that Tibia would win its year, but there’s no way it could stand up to the legacy that is Ultima Online. Not only did Ultima Online bring the term MMORPG to the world (we were calling them graphical MUDs prior), but it also created the basis for sandbox MMORPGs. Players entered Ultima Online with a vision of their character and could match that vision surprisingly well. With skills ranging from magery to musicianship to animal taming, it seemed like the developers had thought of everything. The world itself teemed with life. Hell, you could even own a castle. Pretty sweet.

The truly open nature of Ultima Online did lead to some serious player griefing though. Outside of towns, players were fair game and a lot of stronger players targeted easy prey. Since players would also drop all of their gear and loot on death, player killing could be quite profitable. Less violent players could sneak and steal items out of others’ backpacks. For victims, playing Ultima Online was probably akin to playing a shopkeeper in Skyrim. All the sudden everything was gone and you could barely react.

Eventually, Ultima Online split their servers between the PvP friendly Felucca and the carebear land of Trammel. It’s a decision that in equal parts killed and saved the game. The lack of a strong deterrent for Ultima Online criminals would have wiped out the player base, but the game also lost much of its unique “dangerous real world” feel. The most lasting memory for Ultima Online though is when a player killed the invincible Lord British, controlled by Ultima’s creator Richard Garriott.

Ultima Online has withstood the test of time and to this day is still releasing expansions.

Best MMORPG of 1998 – Nexus: The Kingdom of the Winds

Runner-up: Lineage

nexus the kingdom of the winds best mmorpg 1998 image

I’m honestly surprised that Kru Interactive hasn’t made any new games. In the late 90s they gave us Nexus, Dark Ages, and Shattered Galaxy. All were pretty cool games, and all are still running. I guess the age of 3D is scary, but that’s fine. There are plenty of 3D MMOs out there from other guys.

Nexus: The Kingdom of the Winds was for many their best offering. It seems to be doing the best too in 2016 with biweekly patches. The combat has never been anything to write home about, but what made Nexus special was its social system. Nexus sported a deep political system alongside a mentor system to encourage veterans to help new players. Not everyone was friendly in Nexus, but everyone felt connected. I feel that the systems in place in Nexus make for some of the best socializing of any MMORPG. If only the actual gameplay was as addictive…

Best MMORPG of 1999 – EverQuest

Runner-up: Asheron’s Call

everquest 1999 best mmorpg image

I was tempted to choose Asheron’s Call for 1999 because I personally enjoyed the game more. Ultimately, EverQuest’s lasting legacy proved too monumental to overlook. While developers were trying to figure out the magic MMORPG formula, it would be EverQuest that would leave the biggest imprint of the first generation MMORPGs.

EverQuest’s success was burgeoned by their dedication to creating an atmosphere that resembled tabletop role-playing games such as Dungeons & Dragons. The game offered players mostly typical fantasy races and classes with a classic alignment system. Multiple varying server rulesets were enacted to center gameplay on a particular player activities. For example, the Vallon Zek server would go down as the first major factional warfare as one’s race dictated PvP status. Rallos Zek allowed bloodthirsty players to kill anyone, much like Ultima Online.

Most importantly for EverQuest, this MMORPG offered players difficult PvE encounters and started the whole raiding thing. The Sleeper is perhaps the most famous raid encounter of all time since it took three highly geared guilds working together for hours to take him down. Players also regenerated health slowly after combat in EverQuest, which lessened the action but increased the social interaction. I don’t miss resting, but I lament the increasingly anti-social nature of multiplayer gaming since EverQuest’s MMORPG heyday. For many veterans, EverQuest is the best MMORPG of all time.

Best MMORPG of 2000 – Allegiance

Runner-up: Allegiance

allegiance 2000 best mmorpg image

Allegiance is a pretty cool game that was ahead of it’s time. Some might argue that the lack of a massive, persistent world (games are eventually won) disqualifies Allegiance as being an MMO. I don’t agree and perhaps more importantly, there were no other MMOs released in 2000. It sort of wins by default, but that doesn’t make it a bad game. The core gameplay revolves around one member of a faction playing the role of an RTS commander with their allies controlling individual ships. Maps are explored, buildings are built, resources collected, technologies researched, and eventually full on wars are waged. It was pretty complicated then without a great tutorial and no doubt partially caused the disappointing sales numbers for developer/publisher Microsoft.

Although Microsoft pulled the plug on this pseudo-MMORPG long ago due to population, fans still run the game.

Best MMORPG of 2001 – Dark Age of Camelot

Runner-up: Runescape

dark age of camelot 2001 best mmorpg image

EverQuest may have been the first MMORPG to implement faction warfare, but Dark Age of Camelot perfected it. Faction warfare in Dark Age of Camelot is referred to as Realm vs. Realm (RvR), unique from the free for all brawl that was simply PvP. In Dark Age of Camelot, players would enter the MMORPG by choosing one of three mythical races to represent. The combat system resembled EverQuest so players familiar with the venerable MMORPG and looking for more structured PvP could easily jump into Camelot.

The primary focus for Dark Age of Camelot’s RvR has always been a 3-sided factional conflict. This maintains balance despite shifting populations. While one side may grow dominant, two sides can temporarily ally to turn the tides. Camelot, to this day, is simply the best MMORPG when it comes to epic castle sieges and territory defense. The population has waned, but the options for a true alternative simply aren’t there.

I do want to give honorable mentions to RuneScape for showing that browser MMORPGs could be fairly legit and Anarchy Online, specifically for their hype machine. Anarchy’s promised a unique setting, and I loved the idea of a neutral faction. The video below got me hyped beyond measure for the sci-fi MMORPG.

Unfortunately, Anarchy Online disappointed in a huge fashion and clearly released too early. It would eventually became a good MMORPG, but it’s launch would go down as one of the worst in MMORPG history. Luckily, Dark Age of Camelot would come to the rescue in October 2001.

Best MMORPG of 2002 – Final Fantasy XI

Runner-up: Ragnarok Online

final fantasy xi 2002 best mmorpg image

Although not released until the following year in the US (along with Korean competitor, Ragnarok Online), Final Fantasy XI put PvE players to the test. EverQuest required grouping, but players could advance eventually by playing more casually. Final Fantasy XI scoffed at the idea. Not only did Final Fantasy XI require grouping, it required coordination. The game did not shy away from grinding, but did reward players with greater EXP bonuses for chaining mobs in quick succession. Although grinding mobs was all the rage until World of Warcraft’s release, Final Fantasy managed to create a rewarding system for the repetitive activity. The familiar Final Fantasy setting, with chocobos and all, also helped to draw players in.

The raids and end game bosses of Final Fantasy XI required not only high end gear, but high end skills too. Whereas most of EverQuest’s high end encounters were designed to be defeated if properly geared, Final Fantasy XI couldn’t care less. To this day, Final Fantasy XI has yet to be surpassed in the difficulty of it’s PvE encounters. It’s unlikely that it will be as providing content that only a fraction of the population will see isn’t good business.

Best MMORPG of 2003 – EVE Online

Runner-up: Star Wars Galaxies

eve online 2003 best mmorpg image

Eve Online is to PvP what Final Fantasy XI is to PvE. To this day, Eve is still the premiere open ended PvP system. Corporations ran by actual players fight over areas of the galaxy in order to obtain resources to grow further. Fleets of hundreds engage in battles with similarly sized opponents. Politics and espionage are another layer on the complex cake that is Eve Online.

Not only did Eve Online present its players with an MMORPG that boasted sandbox freedom, it also introduced a unique skill progression system. In Eve Online, skills are learned in real time whether online or not. Want to master a particular type of battleship? Just wait a month. This concept allowed players to further engage in the content they wanted without worrying about grinding for levels. Finally, Eve Online also did away with the common practice of multiple, split servers. Upwards of 30,000 players can still be found playing Eve Online simultaneously to this day. Max player counts of individual World of Warcraft servers occupy a fraction of that.

The audience is relatively niche compared to mainstream MMORPGs, but is loyal and dedicated. There’s simply nothing quite like Eve Online to this day. That it’s still running and a better game than ever 13 years later is a testament to that statement.

Best MMORPG of 2004 – World of Warcraft

Runner-up: EverQuest II

world of warcraft 2004 best mmorpg image

I mean. Duh. Of course it’s World of Warcraft.

2004 would go down as the most important year for MMORPGs since 1999. It saw a couple other AAA MMORPGs releasing in EverQuest II and City of Heroes. Interesting titles such as Saga of Ryzom, Vendetta Online, Metin2 and Knight Online also debuted. But everything paled in comparison to Blizzard’s behemoth MMORPG.

World of Warcraft took the popular MMORPG formula and perfected it. Blizzard’s only truly unique contribution to the MMORPG genre was the implementation of quests as the primary method of leveling up. Until 2004, quests were largely an afterthought in MMORPGs. They were either too obfuscated or too few to be used as a form of advancement. World of Warcraft changed that and set a precedent for the importance of questing in MMORPGs. We even did a feature on MMORPGs with the best quests. You might notice that World of Warcraft is the only game listed that released before 2007.

World of Warcraft didn’t simply rely on quests to draw in millions of players though. Blizzard polished their first MMORPG to the nth degree. The art design is fantastic, the classes are interesting, grouping became useful instead of required, and the game truly brought the Warcraft universe to life in a virtual world. Is it the best MMORPG of all time? That’s debatable, but, it is certainly the most influential due to its wild success.

Best MMORPG of 2005 – Guild Wars

Runner-up: Silkroad Online

guild wars 2005 best mmorpg image

The original Guild Wars was built on delivering a near immediate endgame with long term horizontal progression, heavily instanced content, and no subscription fee. All four of these defining features things were brand new to the MMO space and have surprisingly inspired very few similar combinations.

The maximum level in Guild Wars is twenty, which can be reached in one day. From there, the primary method of advancement is learning new skills through completing various missions. Each player in Guild Wars has access to only eight skills at a time so gaining more skills doesn’t necessarily make your character stronger. Players in Guild Wars don’t chase bigger numbers but instead seek more skills to provide adaptability. Players can even create PvP only characters with access to all skills for competitive PvP. These design decisions lead to communities that don’t fracture due to varying commitment levels. It’s one of the best perks about horizontal progression, but can also lead to players feeling like there’s not enough advancement to warrant continued play. Luckily, Guild Wars does not require a subscription fee.

Up until this point, monthly subscription fees were the norm for MMORPGs. Free to Play MMOs wouldn’t become popular for a few more years yet. Thus if you wanted to play an MMORPG you had to pay a monthly fee. Guild Wars did away with that, in part thanks to the heavily instanced gameplay to lower server costs. Instanced content also allows developers to create challenges balanced around a particular number of players, at the cost lessening the massive part of the multiplayer experience. This has its pros and cons but certainly helped to define Guild Wars as one of the most unique offerings in the MMORPG genre.

Continue with the Part 2 (2006 – 2015).


8 Best MMO Endgames That Start (Almost) Immediately

MMOs differ in a multitude of ways from their single player cousins. One could easily argue that the most prominent difference between MMOs and non-MMOs is the potential lifespan. Single player games will typically last somewhere in 15-80 hour range. On on the flip side, some people have been playing MMORPGs like Ultima Online for over 15 years. The content that keeps players hooked in MMOs is typically referred to as the endgame. This is where characters engage in PvE raids, PvP battlegrounds, crafting high end gear, or doing some other activity where the ‘real game’ begins.

typical MMO endgame raid screenshot

Typical MMO endgame raids take hours or days of playtime to reach

The problem with the MMO endgame is that getting to the ‘real game’ can be a huge chore, resulting in players that never see it at all. Additionally, many MMOs (MMORPGs especially) promise a virtual world to live in, but don’t actually pony up until grinding hours upon hours to get there. It’s like saying real life starts when you reach CEO. To counter this mentality, MMO Bro is highlighting 8 MMO endgames that start immediately.

Now, before beginning I want set some guidelines and expectations. Some of these online games involve a hefty learning curve. Some MMOs will offer immediate endgame for particular styles of play but not others. Veterans might even consider a number of these as MMOs without endgame content altogether. I’ll be taking all of this into account and ranking the games in order. The primary ranking is how soon a brand new player can participate in each of the game’s content segments where the largest mass of players are congregated. It is possible an MMO might score well in one content segment and poorly in another.

Now, let’s get this best of ‘immediate MMO endgames’ list started.

8. Planet Calypso (and Entropia Universe)

Planet Calypso MMO Endgame

Planet Calypso has its differences from Entropia Universe, but both are made by the same company and work in the same fashion.Their unique aspect is that currency is directly tied to real money. Thus, players can acquire real monetary value by playing and acquiring loot or even lose it through repairs, bad investments, and the like. With that said, it is extremely difficult to actually turn a profit in these games. I would argue though that the endgame for Planet Calypso is in trying to do just that.

Both Planet Calypso and Entropia boast lifelike player run economies. The value of goods will rise and fall as players adjust to ever changing market conditions. The value of hunting a particular mob or mining a particular resource will vary from from one day to the next. The value of these is not directly tied to the level or strength of the area they’re found within.

Leveling and advancing one’s character is not necessary to the endgame of making money. A new player could technically find a profitable location to exploit. What experienced characters gain is access to a greater variety of locations, which does increase the likelihood of profitable ventures. More valuable than that though is understanding the game’s economy and mechanics. I think that a new player with a high level character would fair worse than a veteran player with a low level character when it comes to making money. Since knowledge and learning is such an integral part of playing these two games, I feel that the endgame starts on one’s first login. Unfortunately that learning might entail some serious real life monetary losses in the process.

7. Runescape

Runescape MMO Endgame

Game #7 is one of three very similar titles on this list. Runescape is a sandbox MMORPG where players increase individual skills by using them. Once a skill is maxed out, a player can buy a cape to symbolize their success. People in the Runescape community comically refer to the endgame as collecting capes. It’s not really too far off the mark though.

The sandbox nature contributes to an endgame that either begins immediately or not at all, depending on perspective. The purpose of playing is simply to advance your character by doing whatever you want to do. And there is a lot of advancement to be had in Runescape, with a large number of experience points required to max everything out. But advancing your character to a max level doesn’t really open up too many new gameplay opportunities with one typical MMORPG exception: raiding. This is certainly an important piece of the endgame that PvE players will have to wait to experience. Unlike other level based titles though, one won’t need to be maxed out to participate. It will take some time though and bossing is certainly a large aspect of Runescape’s endgame, which keeps the game from a higher ranking.

6. Guild Wars 2

Guild Wars 2 MMO Endgame

From a brief description overview, Guild Wars 2 seems like the perfect game for casual players or players looking to dive right into the endgame. The core elements of the Guild Wars 2’s endgame are World vs. World, Fractals, and Structured PvP. For those unaware, World vs. World is a massive group of instanced PvP battlegrounds where players of one server fight players of other servers in a 3-way match. Fractals are randomized small group PvE dungeons. Structured PvP is where teams of five players compete against another team in a sports-like arena fashion. All of these are accessible early for players thanks to the dynamic level adjustment system.

Dynamic level adjustment works a bit differently for each endgame activity though. In World vs. World, characters receive the stats of a max level character but not the traits or skills. Similarly, characters in fractals will scale their stats to max level but be less effective without traits or skills of “legitimate” max levels. Both World vs. World and Fractals will reward the player with experience though so by engaging in these activities, a player can both experience the endgame and progress their character. Structured PvP has no form of character advancement, but players are all put on even footing in terms of stats and skills. Dynamic level adjustment also works in the reverse for high level players entering low level areas. This means that technically one could even include questing as part of the endgame, but max level players rarely go back to previous zones simply for that.

With all of that said, PvE players won’t really experience endgame fractals until legitimately reaching max level. With only five members to a group, a lower level player is a decidedly weaker contributor than a max level player with all of their skills. Thus, it’s not likely many people will want to party with you. Admittedly, leveling is fairly fast with each level taking about an hour, but eighty hours is a bit long for an immediate endgame. However, PvP players of all types can jump in on the endgame quickly after install.

5. Ultima Online

Ultima Online MMO Endgame

Like a lot of the titles on this list, Ultima Online invites new players to an early MMO endgame through its unique progression system. Characters grow in strength by using the skills they want to train. So animal taming goes up from taming animals, sword fighting from fighting with a sword, and blacksmithing from making armor and weapons. There’s no actual levels in Ultima Online and improvement comes from performing personally enjoyable activities. Only seven skills can be taken to max level though so diversity of player builds is quite alive in Ultima Online. It’s surprising how few MMORPGs employ a skill-use based advancement system.

Unlike more recent MMORPGs, there isn’t a lot of guided progression in Ultima Online. You don’t go out and repeatedly raid the same dungeons to acquire better equipment. You don’t fight other guilds for territory control. You don’t dominate the auction house with crafted items. You just play the game how you want and get rewarded by advancement in those areas. The lack of endgame direction certainly limits the game’s mass appeal (more than its dated engine), but it’s also why the game is close to two decades old.

The downside is that like a lot of sandbox titles, PvP plays an important role in character freedom. In Ultima Online, combat will still be decided by the level of a character’s skill, so new players can feel pretty useless until reaching higher skill levels. If the endgame goal of an MMORPG is competitive PvP (even though there’s not a lot to fight over in UO) then this is the one aspect that will take some time.

Still, one might fairly argue that Ultima Online doesn’t even have an endgame to it. My counterargument would be that the endgame starts as soon as you choose that first skill to master.

4. Wurm Online

Wurm Online MMO Endgame

Despite the creator of Minecraft’s ties to Wurm Online, the game never really gained more than a niche following. The release of Wurm Unlimited on Steam has increased the popularity of this sandbox MMO (even though they’re technically different products), but its lack of mainstream popularity unsurprisingly mirrors Ultima Online’s. Wurm Online plays like a 3D version of Ultima mixed with some Minecraft.

In addition to a skill based leveling approach that is even more granular than Ultima Online, Wurm Online inhabitants have immense control over shaping the game’s landmass. Players may create tunnels through mining, flatten and raise the ground, grow crops, and build structures from raw materials. All of the towns in the game are player created and intense cooperation is needed to accomplish the higher end feats, whether on the PvE or the PvP server.

Wurm Online offers impatient endgamers the opportunity to play their character in a 3D world the way they want to play. There’s no prerequisite activities for whatever your endgame goal may be. Want to maximize your ambition and build a kingdom alongside friends and guildmates? There’s no reason you can’t start doing that on day one of Wurm Online. There is a bit more direction in Wurm Online than Ultima Online, and a bit more freedom of actions. However, this comes with the caveat that character skill and high end crafted equipment is even more important for PvP. New players simply won’t be an important participant early on, but every person counts!

Although Wurm Online and Ultima Online give early access to a similar style of the MMO endgame, Wurm just feels a bit better with all of the gameplay options. For that reason, I rank #4 just a smidge ahead of #5.

3. Planetside 2

Planetside 2 MMO Endgame

Although Planetside developers didn’t create the first massively multiplayer FPS, they did popularize the concept. Nine years after Planetside’s launch, Planetside 2 took up the mantle and led the MMOFPS subgenre into the world of free to play gaming. It now sits as a great example of both how to start an endgame immediately and how an immediate endgame can sometimes not bring about the desired player experience.

Planetside 2 is a PvP only game where players align themselves with one of three factions to wage epic, Battlefield sized battles. The core gameplay objective revolves around territory control. Players must decide with their allies where best to strike and make gains. Given the twitch based nature of Planetside 2 and the relative strength of beginner weapons, players should be able to positively contribute to battles from the get go. Unfortunately, Planetside 2 has a surprisingly long learning curve and the lack of a good community support system to overcome it. New players can often feel like their contributions are meaningless or worse.

In part this is why Planetside 2 has developed somewhat of a misguided pay to win reputation. The most popular MMOFPS offers no paid items that cannot be achieved with gameplay alone. The length of time it takes to “max” a character is considerably lengthy though and paid players can essentially pay to skip large parts of this progression. This wouldn’t be much of an issue except, as discussed above, new players aren’t readily given the proper support system to succeed. Thus, it’s easy to feel as a new player that one must grind or pay to really start experiencing Planetside 2’s endgame. The truth is that new players need a mentor or strong community to help them learn the ropes. I would recommend any new player finding such a person or group before attempting to play.

2. Guild Wars

Guild Wars MMO Endgame

The max character level for Guild Wars is twenty. That should give you a hint of the priorities the developers of Guild Wars place on a fast endgame. By comparison, World of Warcraft and EverQuest have each raised their level caps by over twenty levels now.

Guild Wars emphasizes horizontal progression over vertical progression. Whether a player prefers PvE or PvP, a new player can be grouping with veterans within a week (or a single day of addicted play). The new player probably won’t actually be as good as the veterans, but it’s not due to the power of their skills. Progression comes in the form of learning hundreds of skills, multiclassing, and then narrowing those skills down to eight very synergistic abilities.

The lack of power creep in Guild Wars or a direct competitor (even with its titular successor’s release) means the first Guild Wars still has plenty of life for a new player. It’s an MMO players can play to overcome PvE or PvP challenges without worrying about a precursor grind to access said challenges.

1. Eve Online

Eve Online MMO Endgame

Perhaps Eve Online’s most notable feature is its character progression system. Character skills are gained in real time, whether logged in or out. Thus, the length of time to max out a skillset is measured in years instead of weeks or months like other MMORPGs. Eve Online also emphasizes territory control with an open PvP system in the far reaches of space. So with no other explanation or experience, one would think Eve Online would be the furthest thing from an MMORPG with an immediate endgame. However, three key components allow new players to legitimately experience Eve Online’s PvP endgame within a matter of days (real time, not gameplay time).

First, all ships in Eve Online are useful and each ship type has its own skill set to develop. Just because a player knows how to pilot a capital ship doesn’t mean they’re an expert on frigates. And frigates are extremely useful. They’re quite agile and some of the more powerful weapons will have issues tracking them. Additionally, they are cheap so an army of frigates can take a while to down if replacements are readily available.

Secondly, skill gain is somewhat logarithmic. Earning your first 2% damage bonus make take a few hours. Earning your last 2% damage bonus may take weeks. Even then, Eve Online is rarely about individually encounters. Fleet engagements are where a new player will spend most of their time so the bonus damage or high tech fittings a veteran has can only carry him or her so far.

Lastly, unlike Planetside 2, Eve Online has great community support. The slower pace of the game certainly helps here, and corporations (i.e. guilds) will fight over new players. This in turn leads to new players receiving guidance for what is a complex MMO. That corporations recruit new players should provide even further evidence that newbies can contribute to endgame immediately. You don’t exactly see World of Warcraft guilds recruiting fresh players to go raiding do you?

Final Observation

It’s interesting to note that most of these games place an importance on PvP in the form of combat, marketplace action, or both. Both Guild Wars titles are the only options with more horizontal progression than vertical, pretty much in entire MMO genre. I think perhaps the most telling sign of an MMO with a fast endgame approach is whether or not high end guilds recruit new players. People look to recruit members that can help them in the endgame, and if newbies are getting recruited, it stands to reason that they’re going to be ready much sooner than later.


PvE Leveling is a Waste of Time

It’s truly amazing the amount of resources that developers devote to PvE only for it to be a generic time waster. Even the big MMORPG releases in Blade & Soul and Black Desert Online aren’t bucking the trend. We create a new character, giddy for a new world to explore. That world turns out to be full of quests. Quests to exterminate local monsters and deliver goods to nearby farmers. These quests get pretty repetitive. After all, such quests and monsters exist solely to bridge the gap between new character status and max level. It’s pretty rare that the content that gets us to max level compares to that of a single player game. Really, we’re just wasting our time on low quality content until we ding max level and move onto the real content. And it’s such an unnecessary shame.

world of warcraft quest giver

Marshal McBride here to deliver another generic quest!

There are tons of ways content could be delivered so as not to be a waste of time. Challenging gameplay, intriguing stories, puzzle elements, escalating intensity, or maybe some actual multiplayer elements given that we’re talking about MMOs. Basically, successful single player games deliver high quality content, just less of it than a MMO. MMOs could deliver that same quality of content, but they don’t. Instead they insist on tons of garbage, practically automated content to waste our time. This isn’t in an indictment on PvE leveling but on how developers approach PvE, especially in regards to the leveling experience. Publishers spend a lot of money on games so let’s stop wasting time for both of us.

Imagine if before The Last of Us really began, there was a 80 hour series kill quests before Joel (the game’s main character) was strong enough to start the game. Some of us might tough it out to get to the good stuff, but that early content would just be fluff. A waste of time. But that’s what we do in a typical MMORPG. I think with its mission based setup, Warframe does a pretty good job of respecting our valuable time to provide meaningful content. Warframe blends story elements and good action pacing that is intrinsically enjoyable. But what about the traditional open world setting of most MMORPGs? Open worlds should rather easily deliver exploration, a type of content that games like Skyrim thrive on.

Last of Us grinding zombies

Joel grinding on some zombies to prepare for The Last of Us

And yet open world MMORPGs since Ultima Online have failed to deliver this world of exploration. Open world games follow World of Warcraft’s lead of opening up the game world one zone at a time. In turn, the primary benefit of an open world is lost. There’s no real exploration because players can only access specific zones based on their level. It’s really a shame because these worlds are created with no short amount of effort spent by the developers. And yet these worlds feel completely artificial, lifeless, and wasted because the game world becomes nothing but a series of glorified, interconnected hubs. Some games such as Wildstar and Guild Wars 2 do their part to encourage exploration, but it’s secondary to the main PvE content. The bland PvE leveling content that just wastes our time.

PvE Leveling Dulls Character Development

I like to jump into MMOs and MMORPGs because I like the feeling of developing a character for the sake of the character. I like to not necessarily have some epic tale that’s going to resolve. Or if it does, I want to continue playing that character. This, and the ability to interact with other such characters played by real people, is what drives my passion for the genre. Unfortunately, I have to engage in activities that really feel don’t mesh with my desires. And it just doesn’t have to be that way. I finished Wasteland 2 and Divinity Original Sin and enjoyed those irrespective of the power my characters were gaining. There’s no reason another MMORPG couldn’t provide the same satisfaction. After all, they are just RPGs with lots of other players. There’s actually more developers could do with that!

Instead, the content is always derivative. The problem arises from the expectation of having enough to do. And it’s a lot easier to create content when it’s of lower quality. Part of the notion of “content need” arises from keeping the player base large enough, but that’s pretty irrelevant if content is all soloable anyway. Why not just create some procedurally generated dungeons for those “high content” seekers and craft a meaningful journey for everyone else. I don’t want PvE leveling to be a waste of time. I want meaningful PvE content created with some thought and care. Single player games have been doing it forever and they live and die by it. MMORPGs need to start taking the journey more seriously, because a mindless grind is a waste of the players’ time and a waste of the developers’ time.

 


The 10 Best MMO Music Tracks

At some point you will get fed up with repeating the same track of your favorite video game from time to time. It’s why a lot of us switch to outside music sources when playing games. Everyone has a unique taste and preferences when playing MMOs and games after all. But the best MMO music tracks offer a wide range of appeal. And they offer memories of positive experiences from playing said MMO.

Long after cancelling your account and even wiping the game from your computer, several memories of the old MMORPG will remain. One way to relive these memories is through the games’ soundtracks. Compositions and scores cooperate with the visuals in the games to craft the overall atmosphere of the game. Within the scores, individual tunes and tracks which will bring back waves of nostalgia. The following are our top 10 most most memorable MMO music tracks.

10. Runes of Magic – Main Theme

Runes of Magic was released in the year 2009 and since then it has been a strong free alternative to the World of Warcraft. For some people the game was impressive and listening was also not a problem. It is a great game with a stronger score largely due to its theme tune.

9. Cabal Online – Abomination

This is the song which plays in the Forgotten Temple in the Cabal Online and it’s recognized for two main reasons. This is the only best MMO music that plays in a higher level area. If your desire is to listen to Abomination while playing a game you will have to be past level 100. However, you can hear this song after loading up Cabal Online’s Website. The soundtrack is also notable simply because it is a MMORPG song with words. You can play the song easily in your car and no one will suspect that it is a song from a game you dedicated most of your time playing.

8. MapleStory – Lith Harbor

MapleStory was a unique MMORPG immediately after its launch. It offered the players a wonderful game with stunning graphics, action oriented combats, 2D platforming capabilities and lower system specs. The game managed to claim over 90 million players in two years. The first town, Lith Harbor, in the Maplestory has an inviting and a very friendly tune which earns its memorable honors.

7. DAoC (Dark Age of Camelot) – Combat Music 1

The combat music qualifies to be one of the best MMO music. DAoC established nation war combat, pitting three historic and mythical realms against each other in the struggle for relics. The game is about thrilling PvP combat and holds a large space in many hearts of MMO gamers particularly as most feel PvP in DAoC is yet to be topped.

6. Lineage 2- Dion Theme

If you played Lineage 2, possibly you made it to Dion before you got sick of the awful grind. If this is so, the Dion theme will definitely bring back some of the best memories. It completely and perfectly sets a fantasy world’s stage.

5. Anarchy Online – Main Theme

The Anarchy online is one of my favorite games. I like everything that the game offers but during its release it was not the best – but today it is much improved. Its promotional video highly helped in its popularity growth particularly due to the epic primary theme behind it.

4. Eve Online – Below The Asteroids

This is another MMO soundtrack which is among the most popular and there are people who also use it in other games. Just like Dion’s theme captures the fantasy world feel, Below the Asteroids also captures the free roaming space feel. Moreover, Eve Online offers freedom for gamers to play exactly how they want and the songs allows them to achieve exactly that.

3. Ragnarok Online – Prontera Theme

This is another town’s theme song which forms part of this list. Similar to the MapleStory’s Lith Harbor, you will have to visit Prontera for some time. Ragnarok online has established a big player base that allows job advancement, reminiscent of earlier sprite based RPGs, colorful 2D gameplay and killer music which include the happy go lucky music track.

2. World of Warcraft – Vanilla Login

This game reached over 10 million downloads and such a large number of players cannot be wrong. For the hardcore and the casual gamers, the World of Warcraft was a differentiated game that even made MMORPG one of the household terms. Belief it or not, most games fail to craft a masterpiece by forgetting the fundamental components like the musical tune which everyone has to hear even before logging in. World of Warcraft had a special tune that people will remember for a very long time.

1. Ultima Online – Stones

One of the features that made Ultima Online a popular game is the login music whose name was Stones. The game involved many features from nine previous games. The game was an impressive score that it actually allowed the creator of the game Mr. Richard Garriott – character to be killed. When this game was launched almost everything was possible regardless of whether the producer intended to achieve it or not. Stones helped in setting up the stage for this freedom.

Bottom Line

Video games may be described as audiovisual performances. This means that the sound and the visuals come together to make a cohesive, interactive experience. But when the producer ignores one over the other, the experience will be rather jarring. And unlike graphics which are dated within the MMORPG’s release year, the best of music tracks from MMOs can live on eternally. The tunes are an important component in the grand memories of the MMO you’ve been playing. Nostalgia can play a big factor in the enjoyment of any music, video gaming related or otherwise.

In a game, music is necessary in establishing the mood and the tone. When playing the game, the soundtrack plays into your senses and creeps into your mind. Wonderful music in a game will not become boring or irritating after repeated listens. Instead, positive emotions will be associated with these music tracks, which in turn motivate players to play more frequently or after a long hiatus. Even decades later, I’ll be glad to have been a part of these games. In for nothing elese, just because I got to experience the most memorable MMO music tracks the industry has offered thus far.